Crawl Space Waterproofing | Kennesaw, GA

Foundation and Basement Waterproofing

You may be noticing cracks on your walls or floors. These cracks can be hairline or larger depending on the amount of water pressure around the outside of the foundation. You may have noticed moisture or dampness on the floor or walls after a heavy or saturating rain. In addition, you may have noticed some mold or mildew forming on the walls. Mold occurs due to a moist, damp environment. Mold and mildew cause such problems as allergies, headaches, sinuses and other health issues. Dry rot appears on the walls, baseboards, joists, floor and bottom of a wood staircase. This is due to moisture coming through your walls and floor. This type of fungus is also a major health concern. If you are noticing water seepage, your foundation is at an advance stage and serious future problems could occur like bowing and buckling of the foundation walls and floor. You may begin to notice mold, mildew, musty orders, bugs and insects or even mud after a heavy rain. If your home has a crawlspace, there’s a high probability your house is sitting on a unhealthy environment. And due to “stack effect” (which causes air in a home to move upward), it’s possible that unhealthy air is moving up throughout your home. Due to the high humidity in the Atlanta area, having a healthy crawlspace is especially important for the overall health of your home. Even though a Crawlspace is not a livable space, making this space healthy contributes to healthy living space upstairs. Unhealthy crawl spaces, due to moisture and humidity creeping in, creates an environment for mold and mildew to grow on card board boxes, wood floors, insulation, drywall and other surfaces. Everdry Atlanta is the areas premier basement waterproofing, foundation repair, and crawl space waterproofing company. In an area with so many historic homes, it is a good idea to have your home inspected and if needed waterproofed by a professional.

Facts About Kennesaw

Kennesaw’s history begins when the Georgia Legislature authorized the construction of a rail line through Cobb County. Known as the Western and Atlantic Railroad, its 20 miles of track stretched from Terminus (Atlanta) to Cartersville by 1846. Several small towns were founded along the railroad including Vinings, Smyrna, Acworth and Big Shanty. The abundance of water and high ground adjacent to the railroad led to the construction of worker’s shanties near present day Kennesaw. This area became known as “Big Shanty Grade”. The high point of the railroad between the Chattahoochee and Etowah Rivers is the present-day crossing in Kennesaw. A plot of land was acquired by the Railroad “for the purpose of erecting a Depot and an eating house for the convenience of the traveling public.” This eating place became the famous Lacy House and was operated by Mr. and Mrs. George Lacy. Camp McDonald, a training camp for soldiers, was established near Big Shanty. Named for former Governor Charles C. McDonald, Big Shanty was an ideal location for a training camp. There was fresh water available, and the railroad furnished a convenient mode of transportation for recruits and supplies. There were no permanent structures, and the men lived in tents. General William Phillips of the Georgia Militia was the commander of the camp. The parade ground was located approximately where Highway 41 crosses Kennesaw Due West Road. On July 31, 1861 a Grand Review of the troops was held in the town and attracted a large crowd. Such a crowd would not gather again until one hundred years later when The General returned to Kennesaw. James J. Andrews and a band of Yankee spies boarded the northbound train at Marietta. This train was powered by the locomotive, The General. At Big Shanty, the crew and passengers left the train to eat breakfast at the Lacy Hotel. In plain view of the soldiers at Camp McDonald, Andrews and his men stole The General and headed north to destroy the Western and Atlantic Railroad. But they did not count on the persistence of William A. Fuller, the conductor, who chased The General first on foot before running it down north of Ringgold, Georgia on the locomotive Texas (which ran in reverse). This incident forever placed Big Shanty on the map. The “second battle” of Big Shanty occurred when Confederate General John B. Hood attempted to disrupt Sherman’s supply line. During raids in the area, the Confederates briefly recaptured Acworth and Big Shanty and took 350 Union prisoners. On November 9th, as Sherman prepared for his “March to the Sea”, he issued orders to destroy the Western and Atlantic Railroad from Big Shanty to the Chattahoochee River. He also ordered that the Lacy Hotel be burned to the ground. in the 1870’s Big Shanty lay in ruins following the Civil War, but by the 1870’s the town began to recover.  There were three retail stores, one blacksmith shop, two house carpenters, two Methodist ministers and one doctor. The Western and Atlantic Railroad was rebuilt and provided an important transportation artery for the town. The First Baptist Church and the Methodist Church were built in 1877 in Kennesaw.

As of the census in Kennesaw of 2010, there were 29,783 people, 11,413 households, and 7,375 families residing in the city. There were 12,328 housing units in Kennesaw at an average density of 1,027.3 per square mile (396.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 58.9% White, 22.3% Black, 10.8% Hispanic or Latino of any race, 5.3% Asian, 0.4% Native American, 0.02% Pacific Islander (U.S. Census), 4.7% of other races, and 3.0% non-Hispanic mixed of two or more races.There were 11,413 households out of which 38.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.0% were married couples living together, 15.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size in Kennesaw was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.18. In the city, the population was spread out with 27.0% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.7 males. Kennesaw is located in northwestern Cobb County, bordered by the city of Acworth to the northwest. Kennesaw Mountain is located southeast of the city limits in the battlefield park. Its summit is the highest point in the Atlanta metro area, at an elevation of 1,808 feet (551 m) above sea level. The city was renamed for the mountain. U.S. Route 41 and State Route 3 pass through the city as Cobb Parkway, leading southeast 7 miles (11 km) to Marietta and northwest 17 miles (27 km) to Cartersville. Interstate 75 passes just northeast of the city limits, with access from exits 269, 271, and 273. Via I-75, downtown Atlanta is 27 miles (43 km) to the southeast, and Chattanooga, Tennessee is 94 miles (151 km) northwest. According to the United States Census Bureau, Kennesaw has a total area of 9.5 square miles (24.7 km2), of which 9.4 square miles (24.4 km2) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.3 km2), or 1.08%, is water.

 

WHERE TO FIND US:
Everdry Atlanta
3800 New McEver Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101
  (678) 741-2900