Wet Basement | Macon, GA | Everdry Waterproofing Atlanta

Basement Waterproofing and Foundation Repair

The Only Trusted Name In Waterproofing, Serving Atlanta & North Georgia. Providing effective, permanent basement waterproofing, crawl space waterproofing, and foundation repair solutions. Our patented, safe and 100% effective waterproofing method can be used on foundations consisting of poured concrete, block, brick, stone, red clay tile plus crawl spaces and slabs. We have been in business for more than 35 years and have over 90,000 satisfied customers. Everdry Professionals take a personal one-on-one approach in helping homeowners to understand their options for creating a safe, dry and livable space in their basements. Everdry Waterproofing repairs all causes of basement seepage, including seepage through foundation wall cracks, window wells, porous concrete and masonry walls. We address floor leaks, whether water is coming upward through floor cracks and/or the cove joint (where the floor and wall meet).

John Fahmy and his professional team of foundation experts have over 30 years of combined experience waterproofing homes in the metro Atlanta and surrounding areas. Their dedication to customer service and top quality work is shown from the initial inspection to the expert installation and continues on through the years with our professional support staff. They pride themselves on hiring top quality people. Customers appreciate the care given to their homes and the time given to thoroughly explain the condition of their crawlspace or basement, available options, and the details of whatever project is chosen.

Most homeowners do not give much attention to their basement; those with crawlspaces may not have looked inside there in months or even years. Pest Control and HVAC companies do not have the expertise to properly diagnose issues with a foundation. Everdry’s inspectors will give you a total foundation inspection and provide a complete analysis of any issue with your most valuable investment. They will test for mold, dry rot and foundation failures all due to the damaging effects of excess moisture in a foundation.

Facts About Macon, GA

 

Macon was founded on the site of the Ocmulgee Old Fields, where the Creek Indians lived in the 18th century. Their predecessors, the Mississippian culture, built a powerful chiefdom (950–1100 AD) based on the practice of agriculture. The Mississippian culture constructed earthwork mounds for ceremonial, burial, and religious purposes. The areas along the rivers in the Southeast had been inhabited by indigenous peoples for 13,000 years before Europeans arrived.

Macon developed at the site of Fort Benjamin Hawkins, built in 1809 at the fall line of the Ocmulgee River to protect the community and to establish a trading post with Native Americans. The fort was named in honor of Benjamin Hawkins, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Southeast territory south of the Ohio River for over 20 years. He lived among the Creek and was married to a Creek woman. This was the most inland point of navigation on the river from the Low Country. President Thomas Jefferson forced the Creek to cede their lands east of the Ocmulgee River and ordered the fort built. (Archeological excavations in the 21st century found evidence of two separate fortifications.)

Fort Hawkins guarded the Lower Creek Pathway, an extensive and well-traveled American Indian network later improved by the United States as the Federal Road from Washington, D.C., to the ports of Mobile, Alabama and New Orleans, Louisiana. A gathering point of the Creek and U.S. cultures for trading, it was also a center of state militia and federal troops. The fort served as a major military distribution point during the War of 1812 against Great Britain and also during the Creek War of 1813. Afterward, the fort was used as a trading post for several years and was garrisoned until 1821. It was decommissioned about 1828 and later burned to the ground. A replica of the southeast blockhouse was built in 1938 and still stands today on a hill in east Macon. Part of the fort site is occupied by the Fort Hawkins Grammar School. In the 21st century, archeological excavations have revealed more of the fort’s importance, and stimulated planning for additional reconstruction of this major historical site.

As many Europeans had already begun to move into the area, Fort Hawkins was renamed “Newtown.” After the organization of Bibb County in 1822, the city was chartered as the county seat in 1823 and officially named Macon. This was in honor of the North Carolina statesman Nathaniel Macon, because many of the early residents of Georgia hailed from North Carolina. The city planners envisioned “a city within a park” and created a city of spacious streets and parks. They designated 250 acres (1.0 km2) for Central City Park, and passed ordinances requiring residents to plant shade trees in their front yards.

The city thrived due to its location on the Ocmulgee River, which enabled shipping to markets. Macon was in the Black Belt of Georgia, where cotton was the commodity crop. Cotton steamboats, stagecoaches, and later, in 1843, a railroad increased marketing opportunities and contributed to the economic prosperity of Macon. In 1836, the Georgia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church founded Wesleyan College in Macon. Wesleyan was the first college in the United States chartered to grant degrees to women. In 1855, a referendum was held to determine a capital city for Georgia. Macon came in last with 3,802 votes.

During the American Civil War, Macon served as the official arsenal of the Confederacy[10] manufacturing percussion caps, friction primers, and pressed bullets. Camp Oglethorpe, in Macon, was used first as a prison for captured Union officers and enlisted men. Later it held officers only, up to 2,300 at one time. The camp was evacuated in 1864.

Macon City Hall, which served as the temporary state capitol in 1864, was converted to a hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers. The Union General William Tecumseh Sherman spared Macon on his march to the sea. His troops had sacked the nearby state capital of Milledgeville, and Maconites prepared for an attack. Sherman, however, passed by without entering Macon.

WHERE TO FIND US:
Everdry Atlanta
3800 New McEver Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101
  (678) 741-2900