Basement Waterproofing | Atlanta, GA | Everdry Basement Waterproofing AtlantaFoundation and Basement Waterproofing

You may be noticing cracks on your walls or floors. These cracks can be hairline or larger depending on the amount of water pressure around the outside of the foundation. You may have noticed moisture or dampness on the floor or walls after a heavy or saturating rain. In addition, you may have noticed some mold or mildew forming on the walls. Mold occurs due to a moist, damp environment. Mold and mildew cause such problems as allergies, headaches, sinuses and other health issues. Dry rot appears on the walls, baseboards, joists, floor and bottom of a wood staircase. This is due to moisture coming through your walls and floor. This type of fungus is also a major health concern. If you are noticing water seepage, your foundation is at an advance stage and serious future problems could occur like bowing and buckling of the foundation walls and floor. You may begin to notice mold, mildew, musty orders, bugs and insects or even mud after a heavy rain. If your home has a crawlspace, there’s a high probability your house is sitting on a unhealthy environment. And due to “stack effect” (which causes air in a home to move upward), it’s possible that unhealthy air is moving up throughout your home. Due to the high humidity in the Atlanta area, having a healthy crawlspace is especially important for the overall health of your home. Even though a Crawlspace is not a livable space, making this space healthy contributes to healthy living space upstairs. Unhealthy crawl spaces, due to moisture and humidity creeping in, creates an environment for mold and mildew to grow on card board boxes, wood floors, insulation, drywall and other surfaces. Everdry Atlanta is the areas premier basement waterproofingfoundation repair, and crawl space waterproofing company. In an area with so many historic homes, it is a good idea to have your home inspected and if needed waterproofed by a professional.

Facts About Atlanta, GA

For thousands of years prior to the arrival of European settlers in north Georgia, the indigenous Creek people and their ancestors inhabited the area. Standing Peachtree, a Creek village where Peachtree Creek flows into the Chattahoochee River, was the closest Native American settlement to what is now Atlanta. Through the early 19th century, European Americans systematically encroached on the Creek of northern Georgia, forcing them out of the area from 1802 to 1825. The Creek were forced to leave the area in 1821, under Indian Removal by the federal government, and European American settlers arrived the following year.

Western and Atlantic Railroad
In 1836, the Georgia General Assembly voted to build the Western and Atlantic Railroad in order to provide a link between the port of Savannah and the Midwest. The initial route was to run southward from Chattanooga to a terminus east of the Chattahoochee River, which would be linked to Savannah. After engineers surveyed various possible locations for the terminus, the “zero milepost” was driven into the ground in what is now Five Points. A year later, the area around the milepost had developed into a settlement, first known as Terminus, and later Thrasherville, after a local merchant who built homes and a general store in the area. By 1842, the town had six buildings and 30 residents and was renamed Marthasville to honor Governor Wilson Lumpkin’s daughter Martha. Later, J. Edgar Thomson, Chief Engineer of the Georgia Railroad, suggested the town be renamed Atlanta. The residents approved, and the town was incorporated as Atlanta on December 29, 1847.

Civil War
By 1860, Atlanta’s population had grown to 9,554. During the American Civil War, the nexus of multiple railroads in Atlanta made the city a strategic hub for the distribution of military supplies.

In 1864, the Union Army moved southward following the capture of Chattanooga and began its invasion of north Georgia. The region surrounding Atlanta was the location of several major army battles, culminating with the Battle of Atlanta and a four-month-long siege of the city by the Union Army under the command of General William Tecumseh Sherman. On September 1, 1864, Confederate General John Bell Hood decided to retreat from Atlanta, and he ordered the destruction of all public buildings and possible assets that could be of use to the Union Army. On the next day, Mayor James Calhoun surrendered Atlanta to the Union Army, and on September 7, Sherman ordered the city’s civilian population to evacuate. On November 11, 1864, Sherman prepared for the Union Army’s March to the Sea by ordering the destruction of Atlanta’s remaining military assets.

Rebuilding the city
After the Civil War ended in 1865, Atlanta was gradually rebuilt. The work attracted many new residents. Due to the city’s superior rail transportation network, the state capital was moved from Milledgeville to Atlanta in 1868. In the 1880 Census, Atlanta had surpassed Savannah as Georgia’s largest city.

Beginning in the 1880s, Henry W. Grady, the editor of the Atlanta Constitution newspaper, promoted Atlanta to potential investors as a city of the “New South” that would be based upon a modern economy and less reliant on agriculture. By 1885, the founding of the Georgia School of Technology (now Georgia Tech) and the Atlanta University Center, a consortium of historically black colleges made up of units for men and women, had established Atlanta as a center for higher education. In 1895, Atlanta hosted the Cotton States and International Exposition, which attracted nearly 800,000 attendees and successfully promoted the New South’s development to the world.

WHERE TO FIND US:
Everdry Atlanta
3800 New McEver Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101
  (678) 741-2900